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More Lit Blogs Than You Can Handle
May 22, 2008
Hello Poets and Poetry Lovers

26 blogs and growing!

Yes, that's right. I've added more blogs to the poetry toolbar this week than any other week since introducing it back in March. We're up to 26 blogs that you can have access to with a single click, and most of them are lit blogs. See below for the full list.

And you're going to love this week's poetry video. When I first saw "Wishes of My Voice" I was blown away. Watch the video and you'll see why. This guy describes himself as an amateur poet, but the poem is every bit as good as anything written by a professional poet in any of the lit mags today. You'll love this week's poetry video, by a poet who goes by the name Devinull.

But enough of introductions. Let's get on with Hyperbole!

Table of Contents

  1. Poetry Video Of The Week
  2. World Class Poetry Toolbar Updates
  3. New World Class Poetry Pages
  4. American Life in Poetry
  5. New World Class Poetry Blog Posts
  6. Poetry Book Of The Week
  7. Are You Subscribed?
  8. World Class Poetry Networking


Poetry Video Of The Week

I bring you Devinull. Don't you think he has a certain Edgar Allan Poe flair?

If you can't click the link or watch the video, you can find it here.

World Class Poetry Toolbar Updates

We've added a lot of new blogs to the World Class Poetry Toolbar and you'll love them all. The latest additions include:

  • The Ninth Letter blog
  • Ploughshares Blog
  • Poet Hound
  • Poetry Hut
  • Virginia Quarterly Review Blog
  • Dark Matter
  • Farrar, Straus, & Giroux

These 7 additions this week to the Blogs banner on the toolbar round out an already all-star cast of blogs, which includes:

  • Silliman's Blog
  • The Kenyon Review Blog
  • 32 Poems Blog
  • One Poet's Notes
  • Blogsboro Network
  • Slate Magazine
  • Guardian Unlimited

And so much more!

In addition, we've added The Ninth Letter podcast and "Belinda Subraman Presents" to the radio feature and The Kenyon Review Online can be found under the WCP Coffee Shop banner. We've decided to put it there for the time being because it isn't an RSS feed, but we did think it was worthy of inclusion in the offerings of our toolbar simply because the online version of the KR Review deserves its own recognition.

Be sure to check out these latest offerings of the toolbar. Refresh your toolbar now by clicking on the red WCP on the left and scrolling down to where it says "Refresh Toolbar." If you haven't downloaded the toolbar yet, now is a good time to take advantage of this chance to subscribe to 26 blog subscriptions and a handful of radio podcasts with a single click. And the best part is - it's free!

Download the World Class Poetry Toolbar now.


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New World Class Poetry Pages

This week we've added a new video page for your viewing pleasure. We'll update this page from time to time with new poetry videos. Right now, you can watch poetry videos by Devinull - yes, he's got more! - Living Passion, and yours truly. But don't worry. More to come!

Watch poetry videos now.

American Life in Poetry: Column 164

BY TED KOOSER, U.S. POET LAUREATE, 2004-2006

How often have you wondered what might be going on inside a child's head? They can be so much more free and playful with their imaginations than adults, and are so good at keeping those flights of fancy secret and mysterious, that even if we were told what they were thinking we might not be able to make much sense of it. Here Ellen Bass, of Santa Cruz, California, tells us of one such experience.

Dead Butterfly

For months my daughter carried
a dead monarch in a quart mason jar.
To and from school in her backpack,
to her only friend's house. At the dinner table
it sat like a guest alongside the pot roast.
She took it to bed, propped by her pillow.
Was it the year her brother was born?
Was this her own too-fragile baby
that had lived--so briefly--in its glassed world?
Or the year she refused to go to her father's house?
Was this the holding-her-breath girl she became there?
This plump child in her rolled-down socks
I sometimes wanted to haul back inside me
and carry safe again. What was her fierce
commitment? I never understood.
We just lived with the dead winged thing
as part of her, as part of us,
weightless in its heavy jar.

American Life in Poetry is made possible by The Poetry Foundation (www.poetryfoundation.org), publisher of Poetry magazine. It is also supported by the Department of English at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Poem copyright (c) 2007 by Ellen Bass and reprinted from "The Human Line," 2007, by permission of Copper Canyon Press, www.coppercanyonpress.org. Introduction copyright (c) 2008 by The Poetry Foundation. The introduction's author, Ted Kooser, served as United States Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress from 2004-2006. We do not accept unsolicited manuscripts.

Poetry Book Of The Week

This week's poetry book of the week is Red Bird: Poems by Mary Oliver.

Mary Oliver is one of the most beloved contemporary poets in the world. From the product description:

As in all of Mary Oliver's work, the pages overflow with her keen observation of the natural world and her gratitude for its gifts, for the many people she has loved in her seventy years, as well as for her disobedient dog, Percy. But here, too, the poet's attention turns with ferocity to the degradation of the Earth and the denigration of the peoples of the world by those who love power. Red Bird is unquestionably Mary Oliver's most wide-ranging volume to date.

I don't know what else I could add. Get the book.

New World Class Poetry Blog Posts


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World Class Poetry Networking

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Call For Submissions!

Submit your poetry articles to World Class Poetry. Use the WCP article submission form.

Toodles

Allen Taylor
the poet

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